Thermal analyzers help material QA

Thermal analyzers help material QA

Thermal analyzers help material QA
Hitachi has launched two new differential scanning calorimeters (DSCs) suitable for materials development and product quality control.

Hitachi High-Tech Analytical Science Corp has launched two new differential scanning calorimeters (DSCs) suitable for materials development and product quality control.

The NEXTA DSC range features an optional RealView Sample unit which can obtain visual sample information during measurement, capturing sample images in real time that can be related directly to the DSC signal. This helps to identify physical property changes and the added visual information to the DSC output makes it easier to interpret results, especially when undertaking failure analysis, foreign particle analysis and investigating abnormal results, Hitachi says.

The RealView system also incorporates a high-resolution camera, so that the sample can be observed at very low temperatures down to -50°C, and color analysis (RGB, CMYK and LAB), with both pictures and videos of the sample recorded. Results are stored referenced to the DSC output time and temperature for later analysis and investigation.

The NEXTA DSC600 has a newly developed, thermopile-type DSC sensor, while the NEXTA DSC200 model has been given a sensor redesign. Both models have received a new furnace configuration to deliver a baseline repeatability of +/- 5 µW.

The range also includes an autosampler option with a four-pronged sample holder that can  analyze up to 50 samples at once, and a dual cooling system with three cooling systems available: air, electrical or liquid nitrogen cooling.

‘We’ve designed the new NEXTA DSC range to meet the demands of research and development labs and quality control departments in developing new materials and for ensuring the quality of many materials including polymers, chemicals, ceramics, metals, petrochemicals and food,’ said Ashley-Kate McCann, product manager, Hitachi High-Tech Analytical Science.’

This story uses material from Hitachi, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.